Department of History

About the Department of History
 
The main goal of the Department of History of the Faculty of Education of the J. Selye University is to train well qualified professional teachers in history and humanities who are familiar with the Central European historical and cultural space. 
 
J. Selye University, which is located in Komárno, Slovakia, is a state university, sponsored both by the Slovak and the Hungarian governments. The courses at the Faculty of Education as well as at the Department of History are mostly and dominantly taught in Hungarian language; even though we can run certain courses in Slovak, in English, and in German. 
 
The Department of History runs fully accredited bachelor as well as master courses. The backbone of our bachelor´s training (Bc. level : Semester 1-6) is European history, the history of Hungary and Slovakia, the Cold War; while the magister training  (Mgr. level : Semester 7-10)focuses on the 19th and 20th century history of the Central European region, and the issue of national minorities. The graduates of the Department can make a carrier as teachers of history (both on elementary school and secondary school level), museology specialists, media workers, tourist guides, etc. or work in various fields such as education, culture, and public administration. 
 
The scientific research of the Department of History is mainly oriented on the history of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia, the international relations during the Cold War, and the History Didactics.  
 
Our Department of History has had intensive contacts with renowned scientific institutions such as: the Historical Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, the Historical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences Bratislava, the Forum Institute for Research of Minorities Šamorín, the Institute of Social Sciences of Slovak Academy of Science Department of History Košice, the Cold War History Research Center at the Corvinus Uniersity Budapest, the International Society for History Didactics, etc.
 
Members of the Department of History of the Faculty of Education of the J. Selye University:
 
Dr. habil. Attila Simon, PhD. – Head of the Department
Dr. habil. László Szarka, CSc. 
Dr. habil. Árpád Popély, PhD. 
Dr. habil. Barnabás Vajda, PhD.
Mgr. Balázs Csiba

 
Scientific projects at the Department of History
 
The scientific research of the Department of History is mainly oriented on the history of the Hungarian minority in Slovakia, the international relations during the Cold War, and the History Didactics.  
 
Our Department has been involved in the following international scientific projects:
 
The Czechoslovak Republic and the Hungarian minority (1930–1938). VEGA project : 2/0023/12. Head of the project: Dr. habil Attila Simon, PhD.
 
Forms of Political and Media Propaganda in Central Europe, Czecho-Slovakia and Hungary (1938-1968).  Vega project : 1/0158 /14. Head of the project: Dr. habil Barnabás Vajda, PhD.
 
Reformed Church in Slovakia 1919-1952. VEGA project : 1/0528/16. Head of the project: Dr. habil Attila Simon, PhD.
 
Different forms of Freedom in a totalitarian state - political life, religion, tourism and media in (Czecho)Slovakia, Hungary and Eastern Europe 1938–1968. VEGA project: 2019 – 2021: 1/0163/19.  Head of the project: Dr. habil Barnabás Vajda, PhD.

 “The Character to be from Komarno” (A „komáromiság”) (2018-2019) Subtitle: Changes of a phenomenon int he last 100 years. The project is sponsored by the scheme: ,,Domus szülőföld pályázat 2018” (run by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences) Leader of the Project: Liszka József. Core members of the scientific team: Gyurgyík László; L. Juhász Ilona; H. Nagy Péter; Keserű József; Simon Szabolcs; Strédl Terézia; Vajda Barnabás. Aims of the Project: The interdisciplinary research program is aimed at examining the local and national identities of the Hungarian and Slovakian population of Komárom (Slovakia). By using the methods of demography, statistics, sociolinguistics, media research, cultural history, European ethnology and cultural antropology, it researches how has the local and national identity of the town's population developed and changed over the past 100 years. It also points out the signs of these changes on the town's exterior and everyday life. Under the umbrella of the project as a whole, Barnabas Vajda’s contribution is this:  Apparent and hidden signs of remembrance – catalisators of the local and national identiy, incluing the remembrance of the state border regime in Komarno/Komarom during the Cold War times.

Post-Cold War Military Zones in central and Eastern Europe (2017-2021). The post-Cold War military zones in Central and Eastern Europe represent an interesting environment for social sciences. The presence and withdraval of the Soviet Army in large areas of Central and Eastern Europe and also activities of the Allied forces after 1989, have impacted both landscape and human communities in many different ways. Their legacy is a subject to continuous renegotiations, reinterpretations and interventions on individual, local, regional and even transnational levels. The seminars on this topic (first of which took place in Borne Sulinowo in 2016) are an attempt to provide researchers an unique opportunity to compare original data from a number of states and to present analyses of dealing with the post-Cold War past and ‘foreign’ legacies. Project Organizers and Experts: Dagnosław Demski (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw); Dominika Czarnecka (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw); Jan Pohunek (National Museum, Prague); Petr Janeček (Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague); Karolína Pauknerová (Czech Republic); Jiří Woitsch (Czech Republic); Marie Černá (Czech Republic); Prokop Tomek (Czech Republic); Barnabás Vajda (History Department, Selye J. University, Slovakia); Christoph Lorke (Germany); Christoph Meissner (Museum Berlin Karlshorst, Germany); Ayur Zhanaev (Poland/Russia); Melinda Harlov (Hungary); Tatiana Safonova (Hungary); Istvan Santha (Hungary); Nikolay Nenov (Bulgaria); Elo-Hanna Seljamaa (Dept. of Estonian and Comparative Folklore, Univ. of Tartu); Oskars Okonovs (Latvia).

 

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